April Fools for Albarino

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No fooling around –this April, we Wine Predators will be fools for Albarino from Rias Baixas, Spain!

Legend says that the Rías Baixas are traces left by God’s fingers, where, after creation, he rested his hand. Bounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the west and north, Galicia has over 1000 miles of coastline. The sea reaches inland to form estuaries where the Rías Baixas mix fresh and salt water to sustain a rich and diverse population of aquatic life–and provide an excellent place to grow Albarino!

Each Tuesday in April (and May!) from 6 – 7:00pm PST, I’ll be talking and tasting Albarino (and more!) with other wine writers and educators during #WineStudio’s weekly educational  program using the hashtag #WineStudio.

Not familiar with Albarino? Continue reading

Ferrari Bubbles from Italian Alps

What? There are CARS bubbling out of the Italian Alps? No I don’t mean that kind of Ferrari. I mean bubbles from the sparkling wine grown in the Alps and made in the winery started by Guilio Ferrari over 100 years ago!

On Tuesdays in November from 6-7pm I am participating in Protocol Wine’s Wine Studio Project tasting and education series with Ferrari, a sparkling wine producer from Trento which is located in the Dolomite region of the Alps in the northeastern part of Italy. To learn with us about Ferrari this month, check out the hashtags #winestudio and #FerrariTrento as we taste Ferrari’s award-winning  wines: Brut, Rose, Perlè 2007, and Guilio Ferrari 2001.

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Founded in 1902 by Giulo Ferrari, a pioneer in Italian viticulture, Ferrari was the first Italian winemaker and viticulturalist to dedicate his vineyards almost entirely to Chardonnay. In 1952, Giulio Ferrari chose Bruno Lunelli, owner of a wine shop in Trento to take over. Lunelli increased production yet maintained quality while children  FrancoGino and Mauro added Ferrari Rosé, Ferrari Perlé and Giulio Ferrari Riserva del Fondatore. A third generation MarcelloMatteoCamilla and Alessandro Lunelli continues the tradition.

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As early as 1906, the wines began winning awards:

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Is Garnacha the next “great grape”? Find out Tuesdays in April 6pm PST

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Tonight, Tuesday April 21 from 6-7pm PST, is the third night of four focused on “The Next Great Grape: Garnacha” on Wine Studio hosted by Protocol Wine Studio. James Beard Award-winning wine and food writer, WSET Instructor, and public speaker Lyn Farmer aka @FizzFan visited the Cariñena region last June and brings his insights into the history, sights, sounds and tastes to the weekly discussion:

“I believe Cariñena is positioned to take a vibrant place on the world wine stage. It is not (yet) so well known as regions slightly to the north like Ribera del Duero and Rioja, nor is it (yet) so trendy as Priorat and Toro, but Cariñena’s day is coming.”  @FizzFan

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#WineStudio Zinfandel March Madness; reviews of 3 from Cantara Cellars

This month, Wine Studio is all in for zin! Zinfandel that is… after all, it is lent!

For the final four Tuesdays in March, Wine Studio, which hosts a weekly virtual tasting on Tuesday nights from 6-7pm, will focus on

The Translational Role of Winemaker through a Single Grape

“Zinfandel has been the archenstone for the California wine scene since the mid 1800s,” writes Wine Studio, but what has “remained constant throughout its turbulent history is its adaptability. The grape is planted all over California and represents the full gamut of wine descriptions depending on where it’s planted.”

Each week features a small production winery with a unique take on zinfandel. Continue reading

8 Chardonnays from Oregon’s Willamette Valley

Each Tuesday in November at 6pm PST, join me and a dozen or so other wine writers on Twitter for #WineStudio where we will be exploring the “renaissance of Chardonnay” in Oregon’s Willamette Valley located just south and west of Portland.

Not everyone knows that there is more to Oregon wine than the Willamette’s famed and lovely Pinot Noir. And not everyone appreciates Continue reading