AmByth’s Natural Wines: Biodynamic Farming for the Future #WinePW

AmByth wines, olive oil, vinegar, and pairings

As we bounced along on the narrow, straight dirt road in our 1990 VW Westfalia camper van, with a very steep oak wooded hillside to the left, and a rolling dry cow pasture rising to our right, I was sure we’d gone the wrong way. The sign that said AmByth with the arrow? Maybe we should go back and check. And then the road came to an abrupt end in a clump of oak trees with a climb up to the right and the left. To the left was a green gate and another small sign: AmByth. 

“AmByth is the Welsh word meaning ‘forever’. We view it as our legacy,” states AmByth Estates founder Phillip Hart. 

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Made in Clay From Near and Far: Italy’s Organic Visintini Amphora Friulano Paired with Römertopf Roasted Chicken #WinePW

Visintini Amphora Friulano

Italy has a long tradition of fermenting wine in clay vessels, particularly in the northern part of the country. Known as anfore, orci or giare, they stacked and traveled well in the days before oak barrels. Continue reading

5 Reasons to Grow Organic Grapes: an Invitation to September #WinePW

Winemaker Heather Pyle Lucas at the Lucas Zinstar CCOF (organic certified) old vine vineyard in Lodi

So far this summer, Sue and I crisscrossed California visiting El Dorado County, Lodi, and Santa Barbara County, then I traveled to Oregon on the prowl for a certain type of wine. It’s not red, nor white, nor orange, nor sparkling, nor sweet. In fact, it’s all of the above. What we are looking for is SLOW WINE, wine that will qualify for the Slow Wine Guide, Continue reading

Preview to #WinePW’s August Amphora: Portugal’s Alentejo DOC Herdade do Rocim with tapas

Wine made in clay vessels? Sure, in ancient times! But today? Yes! Commonly called amphora, wine made in clay vessels are made around the world in modern times. This month the Wine Pairing weekend crew of wine writers are exploring this topic and you can scroll down to see the list of exciting titles with links to participants who will be posting by Sat. August 14 at 8am — just in time for our twitter chat on the subject using the hashtag #winepw. Find the discussion questions below.

Read the invitation post here: “August #WinePW Invite and An Intro: OR Amphora Wine and A.D. Beckham.”

Wine made in Amphora goes by many names Continue reading

August #WinePW Invite and An Intro: OR Amphora Wine and A.D. Beckham

Beckham amphora wine

Long before wine was made in oak barrels and stainless steel, people scooped up clay from the earth and they shaped it into vessels for fermentation.

These first wine vessels, made in the Republic of Georgia over 6000 years ago, were called “Qvevri.”  Lined with beeswax, they were buried underground for temperature control as the wines fermented in the stable coolness of the earth.  

Amphora are large clay vessels used since ancient times to ferment grapes and age wine; Andrew Beckham makes them today in his studio In Oregon near his vineyards.

The Romans used a potter’s wheel or turn table to make their clay pots for wine fermentation; these amphora had a base to stand above ground. Continue reading

Indiana’s Oliver’s surprising fruit wines paired with grilled peach salad, berry galette #WinePW

Oliver Moscato fruit wines

A few years ago for Moscato Day, we sampled a wine from Indiana with quite a bit of trepidation. But to our surprise this fruit wine from Oliver was mighty fine!

So when the Wine Pairing Weekend theme for midwestern wines came up this month, and Continue reading

A+ Pairings for Asparagus, Arugula, and Artichokes with organic wines from Alsace, Australia, Austria, and Argentina #WinePW

A+ Pairings

  • There’s a wine for every food
    and a food for every wine!
  • The secret is in the sauce…
    and the preparation!

While some insist drink what you like, and pair the wine you like with the food you like BUT while you MAY like it, and everybody’s chemistry is different, some pairings are A+, others awful, and some just all right.

What I like isn’t always what Sue likes. She loves jalapeños, onions, celery; I don’t. In fact, I have a hard time digesting green peppers and onions. I’m not fond of celery, and I really find that celery seed has a strong flavor that hangs around and doesn’t do well with wine.

Over the years of pairing and writing about food and wine pairings has taught us a few tricks– especially when pairing wines with vegetarian dishes.

WINE PREDATOR’S TOP 10 TRICKS FOR FOOD AND WINE PAIRING Continue reading